How to use Tungsten Lighting for High Quality Results, Corporate, and Broadcast interviews.

When it comes to lighting for video work, there are many different technologies for shooters to choose from. Like many in the industry, I have invested a good deal of money into my lighting, but in this journey, as have many others, I have passed over tungsten lighting in my recent purchases.  

Traditionally tungsten lighting has been problematic for me, with high temperatures making them hard to modify and still producing less than stellar results.   But my opinion has changed since I started using the Chimera Triolet. The Triolet is a small lighting fixture that can handle light sources, including tungsten bulbs, up to 1,000 watts.  

Unlike a lot of other hot lights on the market, the Triolet was designed to work with lighting modifiers.

Unlike a lot of other hot lights on the market, the Triolet was designed to work with lighting modifiers. I am using the Triolet 1000W Light Kit that came as a kit from Chimera. The kit contains the Triolet, Quick Release speed ring, stand adapter, 1,000-watt bulb, Mathews folding light stand, Small Video Pro softbox,  40-degree grid, and duffle bag. So right out of the (included) bag, you have a great light, in a small and affordable package.

Recently I was hired to produce a video on proper job interview techniques by the University of Nevada, Reno’s School of Business, and I decided to put the Triolet to the test. For the first setup, a simple on-camera interview, I used the Triolet in the Video Pro soft box as my main light. I also added the grid on the soft box to try and keep light from spilling on to the back wall. Because the build quality of Video Pro soft box is so good, I never had to worry about heat issues during shooting.

Another plus to the Triolet kit, is that I can use the lightbank for strobe work as well, which is great for when I am doing double duty on set, and when I am trying to stretch my dollar when it comes to buying gear.

For my second setup, which was filming the job interview, I needed to light both of my subjects but had a small space for lights and cameras. To solve this problem I put the Triolet in the Chimera Large Pancake. The Pancake is a Lantern style modifier, but with a flat top, perfect to light a room or, in this case, my table and my two subjects.

When setting the Large Pancake up, I used the same speed ring from the Triolet kit. The Pancake contains two parts, the Lantern or lightbank, and then the skirt, which has four curtains with zippers at the corners. Each curtain has full-length velcro, so you can roll them up or down to any length you need, giving you amazing control of the light.

The Triolet may be a small light, but it is making a big case to take a serious look a tungsten lighting and the power of using quality modifiers from Chimera.

In this first shot, you can see by having the skirts rolled all the way up, I am lighting the entire room, but I am also putting excess light on the back wall, and pushing light back towards the camera. So I rolled down the front and back parts of the skirts, and flagged off that light from those areas.

The Triolet may be a small light, but it is making a big case to take a serious look a tungsten lighting and the power of using quality modifiers from Chimera.